San Antonio and the Institute of Texan Cultures for Kids

March 20, 2014

San Antonio and the Institute of Texan Cultures, kid friendly travel from waddleeahchaa.com

Institute of Texan Cultures

With Spring Break in the air, last week I shared a tips for visiting The Alamo in San Antonio. If you are visiting The Alamo and the San Antonio River Walk, you should also make some time for the Institute of Texan Cultures located in the downtown area.

The Institute is part of The University of Texas at San Antonio and is dedicated to sharing the stories of the many cultures of Texas. It has exhibits of the different immigrant groups that settled Texas, as well as the Native American groups that first settled Texas.

Know Before You Go:

  • I recommend this educational museum for school aged children. There’s not much for wee ones to enjoy.
  • Parking is FREE and very easy in a lot right in front of museum.
  • Adults $8, Children (3 – 11) $6, Children (2 and younger) Complimentary
  • Monday – Saturday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday: Noon to 5 p.m.

San Antonio and the Institute of Texan Cultures, kid friendly travel from waddleeahchaa.com

 The First People in Texas

The first section of the museum highlights day to day life of the first Texans, including migration and the Clovis and Folsom cultures. There are also collections of arrowheads, pottery and uniquely carved stone pipes.

San Antonio and the Institute of Texan Cultures, kid friendly travel from waddleeahchaa.com

What is an Archeological Dig?

My kiddos where totally fascinated with this display of what is hidden in the layers under the city of San Antonio. The pullout draws gave them an up close look at each layer.

Later we visited The History Shop,  located across the street from the Alamo, and viewed a real live archeological dig right in the floor of the shop.

San Antonio and the Institute of Texan Cultures, kid friendly travel from waddleeahchaa.com

The Many Immigrant Cultures and Families of Texas

Next, you can wind your way through the amazing number of cultures that have called Texas home, from early settlers to more modern times.

San Antonio and the Institute of Texan Cultures, kid friendly travel from waddleeahchaa.com

Sharecroppers’ Cabin

A modest sharecroppers, cabin is open to visitors. Amazing how differently we live today. We really have so much junk.

San Antonio and the Institute of Texan Cultures, kid friendly travel from waddleeahchaa.com

 Jacal Home

One of my favorite displays was the neatly constructede Jacal Hut. A Jacal is a hut in Mexico and southwestern United States with a thatched roof and walls made of upright poles or sticks covered and chinked with mud or clay.

San Antonio and the Institute of Texan Cultures, kid friendly travel from waddleeahchaa.com

Learning How to Weave Cotton Into Cloth

This is not just a display. The kiddos were taught how to actually weave yarn into cloth. They both got a turn on the loom.

San Antonio and the Institute of Texan Cultures, kid friendly travel from waddleeahchaa.com

Carding Cotton and Wool

The kiddos favorite part of the visit was making friends with this adorably, sweet old lady. She very patiently taught each of them how to turn real cotton and wool into yarn. She didn’t just show them. She let each of them have a turn from beginning to end.

San Antonio and the Institute of Texan Cultures, kid friendly travel from waddleeahchaa.com

After their turns at the spinning wheel, she sweetly asked them if they would like to make friendship bracelets. She helped each of them twist colored wool into yarn.

San Antonio and the Institute of Texan Cultures, kid friendly travel from waddleeahchaa.com

Then she tied on their handmade friendship bracelets. Throughout the day, they expressed how much they enjoyed their time with this kind women. They certainly did make a friend.

These one-of-a-kind experiences are the best moments of our homeschool days. I think these connections to the past and our elders are more important than anything we can learn sitting at a desk!

And people worry about the socialization of homeschooled children.

Me personally, I’m not too worried.

You don’t often get a chance to make a friendship bracelet with a kind elderly friend at school.

San Antonio and The Alamo for Kids from waddleeahchaa.com

More San Antonio Attractions for Kids

Have you visited San Antonio? What is your favorite attraction in San Antonio?

Sharing this week at:

Little Wonders’ Day

{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

elizabeth708 March 22, 2014 at 1:49 am

That is so cool! I want to learn how to spin yarn!

Deceptively Educational March 23, 2014 at 4:14 pm

My oldest son loves hitting these types of educational museums and learning centers. If we’re ever in San Antonio, we’ll have to stop here! I’m so glad you’ve shared this at the After School Linky!

Institute of Texan Cultures October 30, 2014 at 7:59 am

Thanks so much for sharing your experience! And what great photos. Could I share your post on our Institute of Texan Cultures Facebook page? Thank you!

Jeannine October 30, 2014 at 5:07 pm

Absolutely, our pleasure to have you share the link to waddleeahcaa.com.

Happy to have you visit us here at waddlee-ah-chaa.

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